Get VACCINATED today!

Our pharmacies  have the CDC-recommended vaccines you need, administered by one of our immunization-trained pharmacist

Flu Shots now available! 

100% covered by most insurance plans & medicare.

Our pharmacists are unique because they understand the importance of personalized care. On top of receiving a comprehensive education needed to meet state licensing requirements, all our pharmacists are professionally certified to provide immunizations. What sets our pharmacists apart from the rest are their daily interactions with you, our customers.

A healthy immune system defends against invaders. The immune system is composed of several types of cells. These cells defend against and remove harmful pathogens. However, they have to recognize that an invader is dangerous.

Vaccination teaches the body to recognize new diseases. It stimulates the body to make antibodies against antigens of pathogens. It also primes immune cells to remember the types of antigens that cause infection. That allows for a faster response to the disease in the future.

 

 

Flu

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and can lead to hospitalization and death.

The best way and most important step to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year. CDC recommends that everyone 6 months of age and older get a flu vaccine each year. Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations.

Shingles

Shingles is a painful rash that usually develops on one side of the body, often the face or torso. The rash consists of blisters that typically scab over in 7 to 10 days and clears up within 2 to 4 weeks.

Two vaccines are licensed and recommended to prevent shingles in the U.S..  Zoster vaccine live (ZVL, Zostavax) has been in use since 2006. Recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV, Shingrix), has been in use since 2017 and is recommended by ACIP as the preferred shingles vaccine.

Whooping Cough

Vaccines are available that can help prevent whooping cough, also known as pertussis. Whooping cough is a respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis bacteria. Two kinds of vaccines used today help protect against whooping cough, both of which also protect against other diseases:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccines
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccines

Babies and children younger than 7 years old receive DTaP, while older children and adults receive Tdap.

Tetanus

Vaccines are available that can help prevent tetanus, an infection caused by Clostridium tetani bacteria. Four kinds of vaccines used today protect against tetanus, all of which also protect against other diseases:

  • Diphtheria and tetanus (DT) vaccines
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccines
  • Tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccines
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccines
Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). Hepatitis A can affect anyone. Vaccines are available for long-term prevention of HAV infection in persons 1 year of age and older. Good personal hygiene and proper sanitation can also help prevent the spread of hepatitis A.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The virus, which is called hepatitis B virus (HBV), can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death.

Hepatitis B vaccine is available for all age groups to prevent HBV infection.

Meningitis

Vaccines can help prevent meningococcal disease, which is any type of illness caused by Neisseria meningitidis bacteria. There are 2 types of meningococcal vaccines available in the United States:

  • Meningococcal conjugate or MenACWY vaccines (Menactra® and Menveo®)
  • Serogroup B meningococcal or MenB vaccines (Bexsero® and Trumenba®)
HPV

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common virus that can lead to cancer. Nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected with HPV in the United States. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year.

Over 30,000 people in the United States each year are affected by a cancer caused by HPV infection. While there is screening available for cervical cancer for women, there is no screening for the other cancers caused by HPV infection, like cancers of the mouth/throat, anus/rectum, penis, vagina, or vulva.

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Measles

Measles is a very contagious disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Measles starts with a cough, runny nose, red eyes, and fever. Then a rash of tiny, red spots breaks out. It starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

Measles can be prevented with MMR vaccine. The vaccine protects against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Teens and adults should also be up to date on their MMR vaccination.

The MMR vaccine is very safe and effective. Two doses of MMR vaccine are about 97% effective at preventing measles; one dose is about 93% effective.

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Rubella

Rubella is a contagious disease caused by a virus. It is also called German measles, but it is caused by a different virus than measles. Most people who get rubella usually have mild illness, with symptoms that can include a low-grade fever, sore throat, and a rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body. Some people may also have a headache, pink eye, and general discomfort before the rash appears. Rubella can cause a miscarriage or serious birth defects in an unborn baby if a woman is infected while she is pregnant.

Rubella can be prevented with MMR vaccine. This protects against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Teens and adults also should also be up to date on their MMR vaccination.

OUR LOCATIONS 

Five Points

704 Pratt Ave NE

Huntsville, AL 35801

(256) 534 – 1118

Meridianville

704 Pratt Ave NE

Huntsville, AL 35801

(256) 721 – 0739

MADISON

8020 Hwy 72, Suite G

Madison, AL 35758

(256) 721 – 0739

BAILEY COVE

7900 Bailey Cove Rd SE,

Huntsville, AL 35802

(256) 650-2335